Old High Church Open Day Friday 9 June 2017

Friends of the Old High Church are holding an open day from 10am till 4pm on Friday 9 June, St Columba Day. There will be organ music at intervals during the day, and a short talk at 1pm about St Columba and his connection to the Old High and Inverness.  Refreshments available. For information contact Christina Cameron christinajcameron6<at>gmail.com or find out more about Friends of the Old High Church here.

Old High Church summer opening times

Old High-1

This summer, visit one of the landmarks of Inverness: the Old High Church, the original parish church of Inverness.

It is open to visitors on weekdays until September on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, from 10am to 12 noon and 2-4pm each day. Services are at 11.15am on Sundays.

Click here for more information about the Old High Church.

Whether you are a local or a visitor, you are most welcome to come and look around the most historic building in Inverness. You’ll be warmly welcomed by our volunteer guides.

We can always use more volunteers, especially to cover times when the regulars can’t make it – please contact us if you would like to help.

Old High Organ Recital 8 October 2016

OLD HIGH MUSIC

The next of this year’s organ recitals takes place on Saturday 8 October at 12 noon, when Stephen Doughty (Director of Music and Organist at St John’s Church, Princes Street, Edinburgh) is going to perform a programme which will include the Prelude and Fugue in E flat minor by J S Bach, the well-known Organ Sonata No. 4 by Mendelssohn and music by Henry Smart, whom we also know as the composer of a much loved hymn.
Stephen is a highly-regarded musician around Scotland and this promises to be a memorable recital.
Click here to download the programme

Leftover people: Sermon for the Kirking of the Council, 11 September 2016

Scripture Readings: Isaiah 1.15-18 (not Lectionary)

Luke 15:1-10

In the name of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, Amen.

At the beginning of today’s Bible reading, Jesus of Nazareth is in trouble. This happened to Jesus a lot. Again and again, he went against people’s expectations, and this upset some of them.

Luke tells us that, ‘all the tax collectors and sinners were coming near to listen to him’. Tax collectors were not popular in a country under Roman occupation. Sinners were those who were thought to have broken moral and religious rules.

This causes ‘the Pharisees and the scribes’ to grumble. These are the respectable, those who think of themselves as very religious and moral. Nowadays they might be called ‘role-models’, to show the rest of us how to live. Admired by most people, they have a high opinion of themselves, for they are the kind of people who usually think they are right. And they believe that they have God on their side.

So they grumble: ‘This fellow welcomes sinners and eats with them’. They think that Jesus is attracting the wrong crowd. How can Jesus be a respected religious teacher, if his audience attracts people who are pretty irreligious? As the Pharisees and the scribes see it, there must be something wrong with a religious teacher who attracts the outcasts, the scum, the dregs of society, the irreligious, the immoral.

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