Organist and choir master sought for Old High Church

We are currently searching for a new organist and choirmaster for the Old High Church.

Below is the advert for the post. A fuller job description will appear here later- please visit again!

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER AT OLD HIGH CHURCH

We are looking for someone to play the finest organ in the Highlands

Old High St Stephen’s congregation are seeking an organist and choirmaster for the Old High Church, Inverness.

The Old High is the original parish church of the city of Inverness. We have a fine Willis organ, beautifully restored in 2010, which is often used for concerts (our new organist can help develop this aspect of our music).

We have a small but enthusiastic choir. Our worship is formal, but music is a blend of old and new.

Our vision for worship at the Old High is to further develop our tradition of formal worship whilst being open to fresh ideas.

If you would like to know more, our minister would be happy to speak to you: The Rev Peter W Nimmo 01463 250 802 peternimmo@minister.com

Paradoxical freedom: sermon for 29 September 2014 (St Stephen’s communion)

Old High St Stephen’s, Inverness
Sunday 28 September 2014

SERMON
Texts:  Romans 12:9-21
Matthew 16:21-28

Paradoxical freedom

A few years ago, former Pope Benedict XIV, pondering why is Christianity is so unpopular in Europe today, said that he thought many people were put off Christianity because they think that, he said, that ‘Christianity is composed of laws and bans which one has to keep’ which is ‘something toilsome and cumbersome’ I didn’t often agree with Benedict, but I think he was right that time. Many people do think that Christianity- in its Catholic or Protestant forms- is cumbersome. I happen to believe that believing in Christ sets us free. But that is not always how it is seen. Continue reading

Sunday Bulletin for 21 September 2014

WORSHIP THIS WEEK

Sunday 28 September 2014

10am Sacrament of Holy Communion at St Stephen’s

11.15 Morning Worship at Old High

ledbyRevArthurSinclair,PastoralAssistant

NB no evening communion at St Stephen’s- this will take place on October 5, and thereafter on the first Sunday of the month

SUNDAY BULLETIN ITEMS should be sent to Jim Monro:

The deadline for all items is Wednesday at noon

NEWS FROM OUR CONGREGATION

LUNCH CLUB The Lunch Club will meet at 12.30pm on Thursday 25 September at the Craigmonie Hotel . Please consider joining us for good food and fellowship. Transport is available. Contact Val Cantlay for further information.

CHURCH MAGAZINE The next edition of the Church magazine is available. Will distributors please collect their bundle after the Service. Anyone can pick up a copy today.

GLASGOW PHOENIX CHOIR This famous choir will be performing at the Old High Church on Sunday 28th September at 3pm. This is a major fundraising event for us as all proceeds from our tickets go to Old High St Stephen’s Church. There are also tickets being sold by other charities in the town. Tickets priced at £10, £8 concession available today from Linda Philip or Margaret Sutherland or at the door on the day.

CAMERON HOUSE FRIENDS GROUP Annual fund raising Afternoon Tea on Saturday 27th September from 2.00 – 4.00pm, in Scout Hall, Green Drive (Culduthel Road) with various stalls; all donations gratefully received. Admission £2.50. Children free. Tickets are available from Val Cantlay, Rae Swan, Mary Home and Christine MacKenzie. For further details please contact Rae Swan telephone.

MUSIC IN THE OLD HIGH Richard Steele returns a third time to play an organ recital on Saturday 4 October at noon. The recital is part of the 150th anniversary of the Royal College of Organists and donations will go to the RCO Anniversary Appeal. Details contact Rena Beaton. To receive information about music at Old High St Stephen’s,

HOBBY/CRAFTEVENINGS have re-commenced fortnightly in St Stephen’s Hall at 7.30pm on Wednesday 24 September. Please bring your craft to share with others. Also if not a crafter perhaps you would like to learn. Please come along and enjoy the camaraderie. Further details from Margaret MacaTeer (Social & Fundraising Action Team)

PUPPETS AND PIZZA LUNCH is on Saturday 27 September from 11.00 to 1.00pm in St Stephen’s Hall. Children of all ages welcome, featuring Out of the Box puppets. To help with catering numbers please let Jennifer Morrison know if you can come by 16 September.

COFFEE MORNING FOR LEPROSY MISSION Saturday 4 October at 10am in the Old High Church Hall. There will be a Bring and Buy Stall. Tickets are £2.50 and are available from Mary Home and Ruth Martin.

HARVEST FESTIVAL The Old High Church will be open from 10am on Saturday 4 October. Donations of foliage and flowers would be much appreciated. Helpers will also be required on the Sunday to help distribute gifts to the elderly and housebound. Any queries please contact Christine MacKenzie as Sally McCubbin is on holiday.

HOME GROUP will start again on Wednesday 15th October running from 7.30 – 9 pm. We will decide on the syllabus at the first meeting. Last year we had one session of studying Peter’s sermons and one of reading Philip Yancy’s book ‘The Jesus I never Knew’. We meet fortnightly and will be meeting at Winnie Stafford’s house at 13 Cradlehall Park. We start with a prayer, then some discussion followed by a cup of tea. New members would be very welcome. If you would like more information or a lift please contact David Martin or Deborah Macrae.

CROSS REACH CHRISTMAS CATALOGUE is now at the church doors. It is known it is still early to be thinking about Christmas. By the time the order was placed last year in early November several items were sold out. The calendar this year has exceptional views and costs £4.50. Please complete the order forms and return to Rae Swan or Sheila MacLeod by 19th October. An order for more than £100 is postage free.

WORD FOR TODAY New copies of Word for Today, daily Bible readings and comment are available free in the vestibules at each church.

CROSS REACH Cross Reach edition of news and prayer letter (October to January) now available at church doors.

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER AT OLD HIGH CHURCH

Old High St Stephen’s Church

Charity No SCO35073

We are looking for someone to play the finest organ in the Highlands

Old High St Stephen’s congregation are seeking an organist and choirmaster for the Old High Church, Inverness. The Old High is the original parish church of the city of Inverness. We have a fine Willis organ, beautifully restored in 2010, which is often used for concerts (our new organist can help develop this aspect of our music). We have a small but enthusiastic choir. Our worship is formal, but music is a blend of old and new. Our vision for worship at the Old High is to further develop our tradition of worship by being open to fresh ideas.

If you would like to know more, our minister would be happy to speak to you:

The Rev Peter W Nimmo

PART TIME CHURCH ADMINISTRATORREQUIRED

Old High St Stephen’s Church

Charity No SCO35073

Assistant required to support the Minister with administration duties. Good IT and administrative skills essential. Work will initially be undertaken at the manse office or at own home.

Salary at market rate, 8 hours per week

Application form available from Linda Philip, Session Clerk

OTHER NEWS

SAYING GOODBYE Commemorative Services for people who have lost babies at any stage of pregnancy, at birth or in infancy, on 24 September at 7:30pm in St Andrews Cathedral Inverness. This event is free to attend. Details Susan Horsley.

SAME Scottish Association for Music Education- Workshop to support work in voice education on Saturday 27 September in Culloden Academy. The Workshop is designed for Singers and Conductors and will include singing technique, posture, effective communication, gesture and lot more. Fee: £30, Details: Ann Hopkins.

THE WORK OF THE BIBLE SOCIETY IN IRAQ A number of events are scheduled to take place in the Highlands in October 2014. These are a part of a national tour featuring guest speaker Nabil from the Iraq Bible Society, explaining the challenging work of distributing Bibles in the Middle East. The Inverness event takes place on Saturday 4th October 2014 from 7:30pm-9:00pm at Kinmylies Church, with music by the Inverness Acclaim Choir. Contact Willie Morrison for details

ADVANCE NOTICES (more than 4 weeks)

MISSION Streetscape Workshops seek to respond to the real issues ‘live’ to local projects so the sessions are flexible to participants on the day. This particular Workshop aims to encourage participants to take a fresh look at mission and the building of ecclesiology which works. The Workshop is on Wednesday 22 October from 9.45am to 3.30pm at 121 George Street Edinburgh. For more details contact the Minister or Linda Phillip.

BLYTHSWOOD SHOE BOX APPEAL By filling a shoebox with simple gifts you can bring laughter to someone this Christmas.Please collect a leaflet (at the Church Door) about the 21st Shoebox Appeal. Filled boxes can be delivered to the Blythswood Shop in Academy Street or to their new Superstore on Harbour Road. Ask anyone in the Pastoral Care Team if you require help in delivering your box. All boxes to be handed in by 7 November. For more details contact Val Cantlay.

BRIDGE EVENING This event will now take place at St Stephen’s Hall at 7pm on Friday 24 October. Tickets are £7.50 and are available from Margaret MacTeer, Christina Cameron and Diana Fraser. For details contact Diana Fraser.

DEMENTIAFRIENDLYCHURCHESCrossReach has arranged a series of training days for Ministers, Pastoral Care Teams and all those that administer to members with dementia. The event in Inverness is in the East Church on Saturday22November from 10.30 to 15.00. The day includes key note speakers, workshops on pastoral visiting and worship, and there will be an opportunity in the afternoon to hear from some congregations who are running dementia projects. To register an interest please contact Lynne Hood of the Ministries Council. A day delegate fee of £15 will be charged. Any elders or those who care for dementia sufferers should contact the Minister.

A strange generosity: sermon for Sunday 21 September 2014

Old High St Stephen’s, Inverness
Sunday 21 September 2014: Year A, Proper 20

SERMON

A strange generosity
In the name of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, Amen.

Old Testament reading: Exodus 16:1-15

The people of Israel are now in the wilderness. Finding the water undrinkable, they have complained to Moses, and God has made it potable. He has tested their faith: will they accept him by trusting that he will feed and rule them? Now the Israelites grumble once again.

1 The whole Israelite community set out from Elim, and on the fifteenth day of the second month after they had left Egypt, they came to the desert of Sin, which is between Elim and Sinai. 2 There in the desert they all complained to Moses and Aaron 3 and said to them, “We wish that the Lord had killed us in Egypt. There we could at least sit down and eat meat and as much other food as we wanted. But you have brought us out into this desert to starve us all to death.”
The Lord said to Moses, “Now I am going to cause food to rain down from the sky for all of you. The people must go out every day and gather enough for that day. In this way I can test them to find out if they will follow my instructions. 5 On the sixth day they are to bring in twice as much as usual and prepare it.”
6 So Moses and Aaron said to all the Israelites, “This evening you will know that it was the Lord who brought you out of Egypt. 7 In the morning you will see the dazzling light of the Lord’s presence. He has heard your complaints against him—yes, against him, because we are only carrying out his instructions.” 8 Then Moses said, “It is the Lord who will give you meat to eat in the evening and as much bread as you want in the morning, because he has heard how much you have complained against him. When you complain against us, you are really complaining against the Lord.”
9 Moses said to Aaron, “Tell the whole community to come and stand before the Lord, because he has heard their complaints.” 10 As Aaron spoke to the whole community, they turned toward the desert, and suddenly the dazzling light of the Lord appeared in a cloud. 11 The Lord said to Moses, 12 “I have heard the complaints of the Israelites. Tell them that at twilight they will have meat to eat, and in the morning they will have all the bread they want. Then they will know that I, the Lord, am their God.”
13 In the evening a large flock of quails flew in, enough to cover the camp, and in the morning there was dew all around the camp. 14 When the dew evaporated, there was something thin and flaky on the surface of the desert. It was as delicate as frost. When the Israelites saw it, they didn’t know what it was and asked each other, “What is it?”
Moses said to them, “This is the food that the Lord has given you to eat.

It has been quite a week. A week of conversations- not all about the same subject, but many of them were. A week when we suddenly realised that history was in the making.

When I went into the polling booth and looked at the form, I surprised myself by suddenly being overcome by the immensity of the question: ‘Should Scotland be an independent country?’

On Thursday night, a colleague of mine commented, ‘It’ll be like going to bed on cruise ship tonight. I’m not sure which country I’ll wake up in tomorrow’. Some people woke up disappointed. Some people woke up relieved. My overwhelming reaction is that I was not surprised it was no, although I have been surprised by how close it became in the last few weeks. But I think we did wake up in a different country on Friday morning. When I left the manse on Friday, the first person I knew whom I met- a member of this congregation, as it happens- told me he had voted no. ‘But I didn’t vote no for nothing to change’, he said.

Change is in the air. Exactly what kind of change we do not know. But something has to happen when we have come through the sort of national experience. All those thousands of people who voted for the first time- not just the youngsters, but people of all ages who have felt that their votes didn’t matter before. All the people- in both campaigns- who discovered that they were interested enough to get involved in campaigning, who talked about it all with family and friends, who went to public meetings for the first time ever. A turnout of 86 per cent. It remains to be seen if people continue to be so interested- I hope so, for that’s healthy for a nation. In many ways, it has been a good week for democracy. We needed to have this vote, and on the whole, we’ve done it very well. I think we should be a bit proud of ourselves.

I always thought that the time after the referendum would be an uncertain time for us all, and I don’t think I’m wrong about that. Neither a yes or no was going to take us into the promised land. Funnily enough, in the Old Testament text set for today we meet the people of Israel, just escaped from Egypt, and starting out for the promised land. They are complaining to their leaders- you’d think they were Scots- that they have nothing to eat. It is going to be a long, hard slog across the desert, and there will be plenty of complaining ahead. And yet Moses is able to tell them that God will provide for them. They are fed with manna and quails, and they discover that the food from heaven will appear each day, and that there will be just enough for everyone.

After crossing the Red Sea, the Israelites faced long, wearisome years of wandering in the desert before they got to their promised land. Just leaving slavery behind didn’t end it. We have may thought we had done something decisive on Thursday- that cross in the box seems to foretell so much. Yet now we know that, however we voted, it was just the beginning.

Many of us today are used to having our desires met immediately. We find it hard to be patient. We, too, demand a lot from our leaders, and of our God. And yet God promises that he will sustain us, even- especially- when we seem to be in a desert. Parched and hungry we may be, but there will be food, manna to keep us going. Jesus referred to this story when he said, ‘I am the bread of life’ (John 6.35; John 6.48). For those of us who follow him, Christ is indeed the one who sustains when we find ourselves in a wilderness of confusion, uncertainty and doubt. Whatever lies ahead, may Christ continue to be for each of us the bread of life, the spiritual food we desperately need as we wander in the wilderness.

And the New Testament give us another tale- a parable of Jesus- to live by and to help sustain us. It is, for us, a strange story, both in its setting, and in its meaning:

Matthew 20:1-16

Peter has asked Jesus about who has priority in the kingdom of heaven. He has suggested that there must be greater rewards for himself and the other disciples, who have left everything. Now Jesus explains what the kingdom of heaven is really like.

1 “The Kingdom of heaven is like this. Once there was a man who went out early in the morning to hire some men to work in his vineyard. 2 He agreed to pay them the regular wage, a silver coin a day, and sent them to work in his vineyard. 3 He went out again to the marketplace at nine o’clock and saw some men standing there doing nothing, 4 so he told them, ‘You also go and work in the vineyard, and I will pay you a fair wage.’ 5 So they went. Then at twelve o’clock and again at three o’clock he did the same thing. 6 It was nearly five o’clock when he went to the marketplace and saw some other men still standing there. ‘Why are you wasting the whole day here doing nothing?’ he asked them. 7 ‘No one hired us,’ they answered. ‘Well, then, you go and work in the vineyard,’ he told them.
“When evening came, the owner told his foreman, ‘Call the workers and pay them their wages, starting with those who were hired last and ending with those who were hired first.’ 9 The men who had begun to work at five o’clock were paid a silver coin each. 10 So when the men who were the first to be hired came to be paid, they thought they would get more; but they too were given a silver coin each. 11 They took their money and started grumbling against the employer. 12 ‘These men who were hired last worked only one hour,’ they said, ‘while we put up with a whole day’s work in the hot sun—yet you paid them the same as you paid us!’ 13 ‘Listen, friend,’ the owner answered one of them, ‘I have not cheated you. After all, you agreed to do a day’s work for one silver coin. 14 Now take your pay and go home. I want to give this man who was hired last as much as I gave you. 15 Don’t I have the right to do as I wish with my own money? Or are you jealous because I am generous?’”
And Jesus concluded, “So those who are last will be first, and those who are first will be last.”

We hear of landowner who hires men for the day to work in his vineyard. He goes to the marketplace early in the morning and hires some men for the day. And because, presumably, he needs more of them, he goes back at nine o’clock and twelve o’clock and three o’clock and even at five o’clock.

This seems a strange situation us, but it is probably how things were done in Jesus’ day. As usual, he’s telling a story based on what his hearers were familiar with. How come there are all these men standing around in the marketplace, waiting to be hired? Because Palestine in Jesus day was a poor country, and so this is perhaps what Jesus saw- unemployed agricultural labourers, waiting where employers would come to find them. For the landowners would hire men when they needed them- perhaps for the harvest, or to dig ditches or do whatever work was needed done that day. Within living memory, farm workers in this country were often hired and fired in this way. And perhaps its coming back, with the zero-hours contracts, where employers pay people for only the time they need them. Maybe this isn’t such an unfamiliar concept to people today after all.

But what will seems strange to us is the conclusion of the story. Regardless of what time they started, the landowner pays each of them the same. In the evening, the men who started at five o’clock are paid a silver coin. And so is everyone else. Those who worked all day- from early in the morning- complain to the employer (there’s a lot of complaining going on in today’s Bible readings!). ‘These men who were hired last worked only one hour,’ they said, ‘while we put up with a whole day’s work in the hot sun- yet you paid them the same as you paid us!’ And there is absolutely justice in that complaint- why shouldn’t they get more for all the extra hours.

But the landowner had contracted at the beginning of the day with the early morning workers that the pay would be one silver coin. It happens that he said the all of those he hired, at whatever time of day. ‘”Listen, friend,” the owner answered one of them, “I have not cheated you. After all, you agreed to do a day’s work for one silver coin. Now take your pay and go home. I want to give this man who was hired last as much as I gave you. Don’t I have the right to do as I wish with my own money? Or are you jealous because I am generous?”‘ Seen from that point of view, the landowner seems, indeed, generous. The men who worked for an hour still had to wait for work all day. He’s given them enough to live on. This is no zero-hours employer, but someone who thinks everyone deserves a full day’s wage.

And after telling this story, Matthew says that Jesus said: ‘So those who are last will be first, and those who are first will be last’ (a phrase he’s used before (Matthew 19.30). God’s grace is not given out in different quantities. God makes no difference between us. But it is a generous grace, more than enough for us.

I once went to make a pastoral visit in a block of flats. Just as I rang the bell, another door on the landing opened, and one of the neighbours came out of her house. She was surprised to see her minister standing at her neighbour’s door. I explained I was there because her neighbour had just moved into the area and had come to our church for the first time the previous Sunday. I was visiting him because that’s what I do when new people turn up at church- I try to visit them right away to welcome him and to encourage him to keep coming. But the lady drew herself up straight, and looked at me rather fiercely, and said, ‘But I’ve been coming for years, and you’ve never come to visit me’. I was flabbergasted, and I have no idea what I said to her, but afterwards I thought of the elder brother in the story of the prodigal son, and of the labourers who thought they should have been paid more for working longer in the vineyard.

Why is it that when God is good to us, we can’t just accept it? Why is it we must always be comparing ourselves to others? How do we come to think that, for whatever reason, other people are worth less than us? We may passionately disagree with one another. We might even be quite sure that we were right and they were wrong- whether it was in a political vote, or even in a church matter. But we must never forget that each of us is worth exactly the same to God. When people start to think that their god thinks some people are worth more than others, terrible things can happen. At the extreme end of that way of thinking are people who drive others out of their homes, shooting and raping and beheading those they believe that the heretics and unbelievers are worth less to their god.

But God has no favourites. And ours is a good and generous God. He treats us all, not as we deserve- because we really don’t deserve very much from God. But God treats us with generosity- that unfailing grace which is like spiritual food, the bread of life, to we who believe. We stumble in the wilderness, unsure what to say yes or no to, unsure what the future will bring. But regardless or our yes or our no, God says yes- not to a question on a ballot paper, but yes- an unexpected, generous yes- to each one of us. Thanks be to God for his boundless grace.

Ascription of Praise

Now to God
who is able through the power
which is at work among us
to do immeasurably more
than all we can ask or conceive,
to God be the glory
in the church and in Christ Jesus
from generation to generation for evermore, Amen.

Ephesians 3:20-21 (REB)

Biblical references from the Good News Bible © 1992 American Bible Society

Introductions to readings from Comments: Commentaries on the Revised Common Lectionary

© 2014 Peter W Nimmo

A national day of prayer on eve of the referendum

The Church of Scotland is supporting an ecumenical initiative to encourage prayer the day before the referendum.

Old High St Stephen’s is making our buildings available to those who want to pray or reflect.

OH smallThis Wednesday the Old High Church will be open for reflection from 10am-4pm

There will be a short prayer service at 12noon.

The Old High will also be open as usual from 10-12 noon and from 2-4pm on Thursday- Referendum Day- and the following day (Friday). 

St Stephen's cropped (2)There will also be prayers at 7.30pm on Wednesday at St Stephen’s, Southside Road.

All are welcome to these events.

Here are details of the ecumenical prayer initiative, which has been commended by the Moderator of the General Assembly.

Choose life!- Sermon for the Kirking of the Council 2014

The Kirking of the Council is an annual community event when members of the Inverness City Committee of Highland Council, and other community representatives, process to the Old High Church to take part in our Sunday worship.

Old High St Stephen’s, Inverness
Sunday 14 September 2014: Year A, The Kirking of the Council
SERMON

Texts: Deuteronomy 30:15-20
Romans 14:1-12
Matthew 5:1-11,33-37

Choose life!

In the name of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, Amen.

There’s an story about an English vicar who always seemed to give away his politics by his choices of hymns. If the Tories won an election, the first hymn the following Sunday was something like ‘Now thank we all our God’. If Labour won, it would be ‘Dear Lord and Father of mankind, forgive our foolish ways’. On one exceptional occasion, the Liberals won the local council election. So it was with great anticipation that his congregation came to church the following Sunday. The first hymn given out was, ‘The Lord moves in mysterious ways, his wonders to perform’. Continue reading

Who needs reconciliation anyhow?: Sermon for Sunday 7 September 2014

A note from the Minister: after completing this sermon I fell ill and was unable to deliver it on Sunday morning. I’m grateful to the Rev Morven Archer who took our services in my place, and who used much of the material below. This is the sermon I would have preached had I been able to. I’m glad to say I’m on the mend, since you ask!

Old High St Stephen’s, Inverness
Sunday 7 September 2014: Year A, Proper 18

SERMON
Texts: Romans 13:8-14
Matthew 18:15-20

Who needs reconciliation anyhow?
In the name of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, Amen.

This week the Moderator of the General Assembly, the Rt Rev John Chalmers, chaired a ‘respectful dialogue’ on the independence referendum. It was held in a Glasgow church, but the rest of us could participate because if was put out live on the Internet. At the Crown Church, we watched the speakers live on a big screen, had own audience comments section, and emailed our thoughts back to Glasgow. It was a fascinating experience, being linked up in that way to others around the country. As I was checking that I could communicate with the person receiving the emails in Glasgow, I suddenly thought of the Eurovision Song Contest- ‘Hello, this is Helsinki, here are the votes of the Finnish jury’. Maybe one day the General Assembly will be replaced by this kind of technology- although perhaps the Assembly will be unlikely to turn into a version of Eurovision. Continue reading

Sunday Bulletin for 7 September 2014

WORSHIP THIS WEEK

Next Sunday 14 September

11.15am Kirking of the Council at the Old High Church

(Congregational service: no service at St Stephen’s)

SUNDAY BULLETIN ITEMS should be sent to Jim Monro. The deadline for all items is Wednesday at noon

Introductions to readings: http://montreal.anglican.org/comments/

Copyright hymns used by Permission. CCL Licence No. 970971

Scottish Charity No. SC035073

NEWS FROM OUR CONGREGATION

KIRKING OF THE COUNCIL Sunday 14 September 11.15am at the Old High (Congregational service: no service at St Stephen’s). This year’s Kirking is on the Sunday before the Scottish Independence Referendum. As we think about how to vote, it will have the theme ‘Choose Life’ and will emphasise the necessity of reconciliation. Please ensure you attend this very important community event! More details from Peter.

CAREHOMESMembers and friends of the congregation are warmly invited to help and participate in the following short acts of worship.

In SOUTHSIDECAREHOME immediately following St Stephen’s service thismorning.We meet in the transept and, after tea/coffee, leave at 11.15am.

At ADEN HOUSE, Annfield Road, on Tuesday 9th September at 2.00pm. Details for both from Jim Alexander

GLASGOW PHOENIX CHOIR This famous choir will be performing at the Old High Church on Sunday 28th September at 3pm. This is a major fundraising event for us as all proceeds from our tickets go to Old High St Stephen’s Church. There are also tickets being sold by other charities in the town. Tickets priced at £10, £8 concession available today from Linda Philip or Margaret Sutherland or at the door on the day.

CHURCH ADMINISTRATORWe are re seeking a church administrator to work a few hours per week. This will be a paid position. We ask that the applicant works partly from home. They should have good IT skills and experience in this area. Further details from Rev Peter Nimmo, or Linda Philip.

CHRISTIAN AID Thanks to all who gave to the retiring offering for Christian Aid’s work in Gaza and Iraq. We raised a total of £307.36. You can still make donations at http://www.christianaid.org.uk.

WALKING GROUP The walk today is along the canal banks towards Dochgarroch, meeting at Tesco (Inshes) at 1.45pm. As always everyone welcome. For more details contact Anne Taylor

AFTERNOON TEA FOR CAMERON HOUSE On Saturday 27 September, 2-4pm, Scout Hall, Culduthel Road. Donations of baking appreciated. Contact Kay MacDonald (chair of Friends Group).

CHURCH MAGAZINE Editor Willie Morrison is URGENTLY seeking articles and photos for the next issue of the OHSS Magazine as soon as possible, and at the very latest by Friday, 12 September. If possible, please e-mail photos or copy, deliver photos or printed copy to him

CRAFTEVENING will resume after the summer break on Wednesday 10th September at 7.30pm in St. Stephen’s Hall. Come and spend an enjoyable evening sharing your skills or learning a new one. For more information phone Margaret McAteer.

TEA AND CHAT The monthly afternoon teas will re commence on Thursday 11 September from 2-3.30pm in St Stephens Church Hall. Come along and enjoy some great home baking and a chat.For further information please contact Val Cantlay or Sheila MacLeod

HEALING SERVICE There will be a healing Service in St Stephen’s on Sunday 14 September at 4pm to which all are welcome. (Contact Ruth Martin)

EQUIP CONFERENCE The Kirk’s Mission and Discipleship Council is holding an event which we hope will enable us to take forward our congregational plan for the future. Featuring inspiring speakers, practical ideas and useful resources for the congregation. Choose from a range, including: Messy Church, Fresh approach to exploring the Bible, Investigating the Invisible Church, and managing Change/Navigating Transition. The event is on 20 September from 10.00 to 15.45 at The King’s Factory Smithton. As many people as possible, particularly Elders, are encouraged to go along. If you would like to go, and for more details, please contact Session Clerk Linda Philip

WORD FOR TODAY New copies of Word for Today, daily Bible readings and comment are available free in the vestibules at each church.

CROSS REACH Cross Reach news and prayer letter (June to September 2014) now available at church doors.

OTHER NEWS

WORLD MISSION EVENT at Ness Bank Church, Tuesday, 16 September at7.30 pm. The speakers will be Diane Green, Campaigns Officer, Christian Aid, who will talk about Christian Aid projects, and Rev Susan Brown, Convenor of World Mission’s Europe Committee, who will speak about the Church Partners which the Church of Scotland has in Europe. Refreshments will be available. For more details contact Mary Thomson, Ness Bank Church, Monday- Friday 09.00 to noon

CARING FOR OLDER PEOPLE Faith groups make a massive contribution to the care of older people. Until recently this work has been largely unrecognised by central and local government. We’re invited to a workshop on Friday 19th September at Eden Court Theatre, Inverness, from 10am till 3pm, to share our thoughts If you would like to attend please contact the Minister.

CELTIC PRAISE There will be a Celtic Praise at Inverness Cathedral on Sunday 07 September at 5.30pm as part of the Blas Festival. Inverness Gaelic Choir, Trosg and Ceitidh Smith are performing. This is a free event.

SAYING GOODBYE Commemorative Services for people who have lost babies at any stage of pregnancy, at birth or in infancy, on 24 September at 7:30pm in St Andrews Cathedral Inverness. This event is free to attend. Details Susan Horsley

SAME Scottish Association for Music Education- Workshop to support work in voice education on Saturday 27 September in Culloden Academy. The Workshop is designed for Singers and Conductors and will include singing technique, posture, effective communication, gesture and lot more. Fee: £30, Details: Ann Hopkins