Why worship God anyway? A sermon for Trinity Sunday 2013

Old High St Stephen’s, Inverness
Sunday 26 May 2013 : Year C, Trinity Sunday

SERMON
Texts: Psalm 8
John 16:12-15

Why worship God anyway?

In the name of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, Amen.

‘Know your place!’ is a terrible thing to say to someone. Because it’s always that the person who’s saying it assumes that their place is somewhere higher and better than the person they are speaking to. Even if it isn’t said, still we wince when people imply that we ought to know our place.  Continue reading

General Assembly 2013- how to keep up

The Church of Scotland website has lots of ways to keep up with the General Assembly.

Once more there are excellent twice-daily summaries you can listen to or read by Douglas Aitken. There are a terrific digest of the assembly proceedings.

When the Assembly is sitting you can follow live on the webcast. The debate on same-sex relationships and the ministry is on Monday morning.

Assembly reports and papers are also available.

Theological Commission on Same-Sex Relationships and the Ministry publishes report to General Assembly

The Church of Scotland’s General Assembly will meet from 18 to 25 May in Edinburgh this year. Our Minister, the Rev Peter W Nimmo, and one of our elders, David Smillie, will be Commissioners.

One item being considered will be a report by a commission set up at the 2011 Assembly on the matter of whether persons in same-sex relationships ought to be able to be Ministers or office-bearers within the Church. The Commission’s report is now available on the Church of Scotland website. Continue reading

All one! A sermon for 14 April 2013

Old High St Stephen’s, Inverness
Sunday 14 April 2013: Year C, The Third Sunday of Easter

SERMON
Texts: Galatians 3.23-29
John 20.1-18

All one!
In the name of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, Amen.

Easter is not just one Sunday of the year. For there is a sense that every Sunday, for Christians, is the day of Resurrection. We know from the Gospel accounts that Jesus was crucified on a Friday, and that after being buried he lay in the grave over the Jewish Sabbath (our Saturday). On the third day, after the Sabbath, he rose again. And that’s why, at a very early stage, the followers of Jesus began to meet for worship, not on the Sabbath, but the day after- the day of resurrection, our Sunday- which the early Christians called ‘The Lord’s Day’. Every Sunday is Easter Sunday. Continue reading