God’s mission, and ours: Sermon for Trinity Sunday 2016

Scripture Readings: Romans 5:1-5

John 16:12-15

God’s mission, and ours

In the name of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, Amen.

When I was at school, I quite liked science- though I would never pursue it very far, because to do so you need to be good at maths, which I never mastered. But I did like the experiments. Earlier we were talking with the children about the different states of water- that ice and steam are, in fact, water in different states. At school, we once took a balloon full of hydrogen to the bottom of a playing field, put a naked flame to it, and it filled an empty cup with water- almost a magic trick. But the hydrogen had reacted with the oxygen in the atmosphere to make H2O- water. Liquid water, ice and steam are all made of hydrogen and water- different aspects of the same stuff. Light that you can see, infrared light that makes automatic doors work, X-rays, radar, electricity and magnetism, TV and radio waves are also different aspects of the same thing- different wavebands of electromagnetic radiation.

Nowadays, the scientists are trying to bring together all the different strands of knowledge about the universe, searching for the maths that will explain the forces which hold atoms together through to the gravitational forces which hold galaxies together. They all it ‘the theory of everything’- and they are tantalising close to working it all out. Continue reading

Sought by heaven- sermon for 15 September 2013 (Proper 19)

Old High St Stephen’s, Inverness
Sunday 15 September 2013: Year C, Proper 19
SERMON
Texts: Psalm 14
Luke 15:1-10

Sought by heaven!

In the name of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, Amen.

Català: Gravat del primer terç del s. XVI amb Sant Anselm de Canterbury
Date circa 1520
Source www.npg.org.uk
Author anonymous (1420)
Wikipedia Commons

One of the brainiest Christians of all time was man called Anselm, a Norman who became Archbishop of Canterbury around 1,000 years ago. Anselm was one of the greatest thinkers of the mediaeval world, but most of what I learned about him was not in the theology class, but the philosophy class. Anselm wrote a treatise on the existence of God which began with the first words of our Old Testament reading: ‘Fools say in their heart, there is no God’. And he went on to try to prove, through a very subtle philosophical argument, that the were fools wrong. Continue reading